Python Set and Booleans

Updated: Sep 1, 2020



Python Set and Booleans


There are two other object types in Python that we should cover: Sets and Booleans.


Sets


Sets are an unordered collection of unique elements. We can construct them by using the set() function. Let's go ahead and make a set to see how it works.



Example:


x = set()


# We add to sets with the add() method
x.add(1)


#Show
x

Output:


1



Note the curly brackets. This does not indicate a dictionary! Although you can draw analogies as a set is a dictionary with only keys.


We know that a set has only unique entries. So what happens when we try to add something that is already in a set?


Example:


# Add a different element 
x.add(2)


 #Show
 x
 

Output:


{1, 2}


Example:


 # Try to add the same element
 x.add(1)
 

#Show 
x

Output:


{1, 2}



Notice how it won't place another 1 there. That's because a set is only concerned with unique elements! We can cast a list with multiple repeat elements to a set to get the unique elements. For example:


Example:


# Create a list with repeats 
list1 = [1,1,2,2,3,4,5,6,1,1]


# Cast as set to get unique values 
set(list1)

Output:


  {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}



Booleans


Python comes with Booleans (with predefined True and False displays that are basically just the integers 1 and 0). It also has a placeholder object called None. Let's walk through a few quick examples of Booleans.


They are of type bool -


Example:


# Set object to be a boolean
a=True


# Show 
a

Output:


True



We can also use comparison operators to create booleans.


Example:


 # Output is boolean
 1 > 2
 

Output:


False



We can use None as a placeholder for an object that we don't want to reassign yet:


Example:


 # None placeholder
 b = None
 

# Show
print(b)

Output:


None 


That's it! You should now have a basic understanding of Python objects and data structure types.











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